Panel 3: Contemporary Culture and Public Discourse in Crisis

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Mimi Lu: “Zadie Smith and the Contemporary Anglo-American University in Crisis.

Mimi is a doctoral student at the University of Oxford. Her thesis explores Anglo-American literary responses to the shift from elite to mass higher education during the twentieth century and the historical—as well as ongoing—struggles to transform universities into more accessible, inclusive, and socially just institutions.

Jo Alyson Parker: “Teaching The Bone Clocks during a Pandemic.”

I am a professor emerita of English (as of May) at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, where I have taught courses in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature, literary theory and narrative. My publications include The Author’s Inheritance: Henry Fielding, Jane Austen, and the Establishment of the Novel, Narrative Form and Chaos Theory in Sterne, Proust, Woolf, and Faulkner, two collections in the Study of Time series, and essays dealing with narrative and time.

Siân Adiseshiah: “Ageing as Crisis in Contemporary British Theatre.”

Siân Adiseshiah is Senior Lecturer in English and Drama at Loughborough University. She is co-editor of debbie tucker green: Critical Perspectives (Palgrave, 2020), Twenty-First Century Drama: What Happens Now (Palgrave, 2016),Twenty-First Century Fiction: What Happens Now (Palgrave 2013), and author of Churchill's Socialism: Political Resistance in the Plays of Caryl Churchill. She is in the process of finishing a book on utopian drama and starting a new project on ageing and the contemporary.

Mary McCampbell: “An Invisible Crisis: Jordan Peele’s Exploration of Racialized Trauma.”

Mary McCampbell is Associate Professor of Humanities at Lee University where she regularly teaches courses on contemporary fiction, film, popular culture, and modernism. A native Tennessean, she completed her doctorate at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (UK); her research focused on the relationship between contemporary fiction, late capitalist culture, and the religious impulse, topics all featured in her forthcoming book, Postmodern Prophetic: The Religious Impulse in Contemporary Fiction. Publications include chapters or articles on contemporary fiction in Spiritual Identities: Literature and the Post-Secular Imagination, Sacred and Immoral: on the Writings of Chuck Palahniuk, The Modern Humanities Research Association’s Yearbook of English Studies, as well as essays or interviews in arts magazines such as Image, The Other Journal, and The Curator. She was the 2018 Winter/Spring Scholar-in-Residence at Regent Theological College, Vancouver.